top of page

Zac Braddy Group

Public·47 members

Cie A Level Physics 9702 Nov 2002 Paper 1 Marking Scheme Hit


CIE A Level Physics 9702 Nov 2002 Paper 1 Marking Scheme Hit




The Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) A Level Physics 9702 is a rigorous and challenging course that covers various topics in physics, such as mechanics, electricity, waves, thermal physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. The course aims to develop students' understanding of the principles of physics and their applications in various contexts. The course also develops students' skills in practical work, data analysis, problem-solving, and communication.




cie a level physics 9702 nov 2002 paper 1 marking scheme hit


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2F8EbGPsBeHy&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2fGpO9U9uAVed4OW21oXZe



The CIE A Level Physics 9702 examination consists of five papers: Paper 1 (Multiple Choice), Paper 2 (AS Structured Questions), Paper 3 (Advanced Practical Skills), Paper 4 (A Level Structured Questions), and Paper 5 (Planning, Analysis and Evaluation). Each paper has a different weightage and duration. The total marks for the examination are 200.


In this article, we will focus on the marking scheme of Paper 1 (Multiple Choice) of the November 2002 session. Paper 1 consists of 40 multiple choice questions, each with four options. The paper is worth 40 marks and lasts for one hour. The questions cover the syllabus content of both AS and A Level. The paper tests students' knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles of physics, as well as their ability to select and apply them in various situations.


The marking scheme of Paper 1 is straightforward: one mark for each correct answer, and no mark for a wrong answer or no answer. There is no negative marking for wrong answers. The mark scheme also provides the correct answers for each question, as well as the syllabus section and learning outcome that the question assesses. The mark scheme can be used by students to check their answers and identify their strengths and weaknesses in physics.


The mark scheme of Paper 1 of the November 2002 session can be found in [this document]. The document also contains the question paper and the examiner report. The examiner report provides feedback on the performance of candidates, as well as comments on common errors and misconceptions. The report also gives advice on how to improve performance and avoid mistakes in future examinations.


The mark scheme of Paper 1 of the November 2002 session reveals that the paper was well attempted by most candidates, with an average score of about 28 out of 40. The paper was considered to be of an appropriate standard and difficulty for A Level physics. However, some questions were found to be more challenging than others, especially those that required higher-order thinking skills, such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Some questions also tested candidates' ability to apply their knowledge in unfamiliar contexts or across different topics.


Some of the questions that were particularly difficult for candidates were:



  • Question 7: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of work done by a variable force. Many candidates failed to recognize that the work done by a force is equal to the area under the force-displacement graph, and chose option B instead of option D.



  • Question 15: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of electric potential difference. Many candidates confused electric potential difference with electric potential energy, and chose option C instead of option B.



  • Question 23: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of diffraction. Many candidates failed to apply Huygens' principle to explain why diffraction occurs when a wave passes through a narrow gap, and chose option A instead of option D.



  • Question 31: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of nuclear fission. Many candidates failed to recognize that nuclear fission involves the splitting of a large nucleus into two smaller nuclei, and chose option B instead of option C.



  • Question 38: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of gravitational potential energy. Many candidates failed to realize that gravitational potential energy depends on the distance from the center of mass of the system, not from the surface of the planet, and chose option B instead of option A.




The mark scheme of Paper 1 of the November 2002 session also reveals that some questions were very well answered by most candidates, indicating that they had a good grasp of the basic concepts and principles of physics. Some of these questions were:



  • Question 1: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of scalar and vector quantities. Most candidates correctly identified that speed is a scalar quantity and velocity is a vector quantity, and chose option D.



  • Question 10: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of conservation of momentum. Most candidates correctly applied the principle of conservation of momentum to calculate the final velocity of the two cars after collision, and chose option C.



  • Question 18: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of resistance. Most candidates correctly identified that resistance is proportional to the length and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of a wire, and chose option A.



  • Question 26: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of refraction. Most candidates correctly applied Snell's law to calculate the angle of refraction of a ray of light passing from air to glass, and chose option B.



  • Question 34: This question tested candidates' understanding of the concept of radioactive decay. Most candidates correctly identified that radioactive decay is a random process that follows an exponential law, and chose option D.




In conclusion, the marking scheme of Paper 1 (Multiple Choice) of the November 2002 session provides valuable information for students who are preparing for the CIE A Level Physics 9702 examination. The mark scheme can help students to assess their performance, identify their areas of improvement, and learn from their mistakes. The mark scheme can also help students to familiarize themselves with the format, style, and level of difficulty of the paper, as well as the types of questions and skills that are assessed. By using the mark scheme effectively, students can enhance their confidence and competence in physics.


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page